Mixed Media + Symbolism

Mixed Media + Symbolism

  • <p>(Leftto Right) <strong>George Littlechild, <em>"On Sacred Ground," </em></strong>and <strong>Jane Ash Poitras, <em>"Buffalo Rebirth."</em></strong></p> <p>In the first section, the phrase <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>becomes a motivation for the artists to explore, rediscover, and reconnect to their Indigenous heritage. George Littlechild, Jane Ash Poitras, and Angela George utilize art to represent Indigenous culture positively. They encourage a hopeful gesture towards truth and reconciliation and expanding their viewers' Indigenous knowledge through mixed media approaches and layered symbolism.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) <strong>Angela George, <em>"Nest of the Thunderbird,"</em></strong> and<strong> George Littlechild, </strong><em><strong>"On Sacred Ground."</strong></em></p> <p>In the first section, the phrase <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>becomes a motivation for the artists to explore, rediscover, and reconnect to their Indigenous heritage. George Littlechild, Jane Ash Poitras, and Angela George utilize art to represent Indigenous culture positively. They encourage a hopeful gesture towards truth and reconciliation and expanding their viewers' Indigenous knowledge through mixed media approaches and layered symbolism.</p>
  • <p>(Middle and Right) <strong>Angela George, <em>"Nest of the Thunderbird,"</em></strong> and <em><strong>"Rivers Have Mouths."</strong></em></p> <p>In the first section, the phrase <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>becomes a motivation for the artists to explore, rediscover, and reconnect to their Indigenous heritage. George Littlechild, Jane Ash Poitras, and Angela George utilize art to represent Indigenous culture positively. They encourage a hopeful gesture towards truth and reconciliation and expanding their viewers' Indigenous knowledge through mixed media approaches and layered symbolism.</p>
  • <p><strong>George Littlechild, <em>On Sacred Ground</em>, </strong>1996. Acrylic on Canvas. 60" x 68"</p><p><strong>George Littlechild</strong> is a member of the Plains Cree. He is a survivor of the "sixties scoop" and only connected with his Indigenous heritage later in life.Littlechild's process pushes beyond normative artmaking practices through multimedia and multidisciplinary approaches: painting bold and bright colours, drawing significant symbols, and collaging photographs of his ancestors.</p><p><strong><em>On Sacred Ground</em> </strong>(1996) is an acrylic painting that portrays a male chief with an eagle feather on his head guarding the vibrant and mountainous landscape and everything that lives on it. It reminds us of the importance of acknowledging the land, how the lands are sacred and embedded with various spirits, memories, and stories of all the people who came before us. Above the respectable male figure is an eagle flying in the sky, extending its wings beyond the canvas, suggesting a continuous flight. Adorning on the same distance are two large stars. In the background are numerous shimmering stars. This painting pays tribute to his ancestors and is a sign of thanks for their never-ending guidance to the artists and everyone on this land. All of the symbols bind him back to his Plains Cree identity.</p> <p><strong>George Littlechild, <em>On Sacred Ground</em>, </strong>1996. Acrylic on Canvas. 60" x 68"</p><p><strong>George Littlechild</strong> is a member of the Plains Cree. He is a survivor of the "sixties scoop" and only connected with his Indigenous heritage later in life.Littlechild's process pushes beyond normative artmaking practices through multimedia and multidisciplinary approaches: painting bold and bright colours, drawing significant symbols, and collaging photographs of his ancestors.</p><p><strong><em>On Sacred Ground</em> </strong>(1996) is an acrylic painting that portrays a male chief with an eagle feather on his head guarding the vibrant and mountainous landscape and everything that lives on it. It reminds us of the importance of acknowledging the land, how the lands are sacred and embedded with various spirits, memories, and stories of all the people who came before us. Above the respectable male figure is an eagle flying in the sky, extending its wings beyond the canvas, suggesting a continuous flight. Adorning on the same distance are two large stars. In the background are numerous shimmering stars. This painting pays tribute to his ancestors and is a sign of thanks for their never-ending guidance to the artists and everyone on this land. All of the symbols bind him back to his Plains Cree identity.</p>
  • <p><strong>Jane Ash Poitrs,<em> "Buffalo Rebirth." </em></strong>1994serigraph on paper. 30" x 22"</p><p>Another important symbolism within Plains Cree Nations is a Buffalo. In the centre of the image, there is an impression of a road and also a teepee. <strong><em>Buffalo Rebirth </em></strong>expresses Poitras's reconnection to her Plains Cree identity, her true home. Here, Poitras mixes Indigenous culture and Western society to imagine a future where everyone is harmoniously interwoven.</p> <p>Another important symbolism within Plains Cree Nations is a Buffalo. In the centre of the image, there is an impression of a road and also a teepee.<strong><em>Buffalo Rebirth </em></strong>expresses Poitras's reconnection to her Plains Cree Identity, her true home. Here, Poitras mixes Indigenous culture and western society to imagine a future where everyone harmoniously interweaves.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) <strong>Angela George,</strong> <em><strong>"Rivers Have Mouths," </strong></em>and<strong> <em>"Nest of the Thunderbird."</em></strong></p><p>Weaving is at the heart of George's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <em><strong>Rivers Have Mouths </strong></em>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to George, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the river’s journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p><p>"The River reminds us to listen with our hearts and minds, to strengthen ourselves so that we can uphold our roles and responsibilities... Like the River, we must persevere, cleanse and go deep within to heal and restore balance and harmony within ourselves and with all living things."</p> <p>Weaving is at the heart of Angela's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <em><strong>Rivers Have Mouth </strong></em>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to Angela, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the river’s journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p><p>"The River reminds us to listen with our hearts and minds, to strengthen ourselves so that we can uphold our roles and responsibilities... Like the River, we must persevere, cleanse and go deep within to heal and restore balance and harmony within ourselves and with all living things."</p>
  • <p><strong>Angela George,<em> "Rivers Have Mouth." </em></strong>Coast sSalish weaving. 56" x 56"</p><p>Weaving is at the heart of George's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <em><strong>Rivers Have Mouth </strong></em>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to George, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the river’s journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p> <p>Weaving is at the heart of Angela's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <em><strong>Rivers Have Mouth </strong></em>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to Angela, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the river’s journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p><p>"The River reminds us to listen with our hearts and minds, to strengthen ourselves so that we can uphold our roles and responsibilities... Like the River, we must persevere, cleanse and go deep within to heal and restore balance and harmony within ourselves and with all living things."</p>
  • <p><strong>Angela George,<em> "Nest of the Thunderbird." </em></strong></p><p>Weaving is at the heart of George's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <strong><em>Rivers Have Mouth </em></strong>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to George, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the River's journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p> <p>Weaving is at the heart of Angela's practice. Interwoven within the warp and weft of <strong><em>Rivers Have Mouth </em></strong>are stories and teachings of the rivers. According to Angela, this weaving and its intricate designs and patterns weave our paths with the River's journey and ancient techniques and knowledge.</p><p>"The River reminds us to listen with our hearts and minds, to strengthen ourselves so that we can uphold our roles and responsibilities... Like the River, we must persevere, cleanse and go deep within to heal and restore balance and harmony within ourselves and with all living things."</p>
  • <p><strong>Jane Ash Poitras,<em> "Sisters/Storm." </em></strong>1999. Acrylic on canvas. 12" x 12"</p>

In the first section, Beyond the Horizon becomes a motivational phrase for the artists to explore, rediscover, and reconnect to their Indigenous heritage. George Littlechild, Jane Ash Poitras, and Angela George utilize art to positively represent Indigenous culture. The mixed media artworks contain layers of symbols and are a hopeful gesture towards truth and reconciliation.