New Art Practice + The Seascape

New Art Practice + The Seascape

  • <p>(Left to Right) <strong>Alan Wood,<em> "On the Beach Walking + Worrying,"</em> Gordon Smith,<em> "Beach Stick," </em>and Robert Davidson, <em>"There is Light"</em></strong></p> <p>The following section also reflects the modernists' method of Formalist reading and response. Artists Jack Shadbolt, Robert Davidson, Alan Wood and Gordon Smith use Collage, Abstraction, and Assemblage methods to push standard artmaking practices and to respond to the seascape.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) Rodney Graham,<em> "Napoleon," </em><strong>Alan Wood,<em> "On the Beach Walking + Worrying,"</em> Gordon Smith,<em> "Beach Stick," </em>and Robert Davidson, <em>"There is Light"</em></strong></p> <p>The following section also reflects the modernists' method of Formalist reading and response. Artists Jack Shadbolt, Robert Davidson, Alan Wood and Gordon Smith use Collage, Abstraction, and Assemblage methods to push standard artmaking practices and respond to the seascape.</p>
  • <p><strong>Jack Shadbolt,<em> "Shore Image." </em></strong>1997. Intaglio on paper. 32" x 38 1/2"</p><p>Jack Shadbolt was born in England in 1909. In 1912, his family immigrated to Canada. Shadbolt lived through the Modernist art movement. <strong><em>Shore Image </em></strong>is a great example of Shadbolt's search for form. It uses collage as a compositional method. Here, you can see Shadbolt's reference to human made and natural elements. In addition, this piece shows his exploration of the formal elements of painting, including texture, line, colour, shape, form, space, value, and point.</p> <p><strong>Jack Shadbolt,<em> "Shore Image." </em></strong>1997. Intaglio on paper. 32" x 38 1/2"</p><p>Jack Shadbolt was born in England in 1909. In 1912, his family immigrated to Canada. Shadbolt lived through the Modernist art movement. <strong><em>Shore Image </em></strong>is a great example of Shadbolt's search for form. It uses collage as a compositional method. Here, you can see Shadbolt's reference to human made and natural elements. In addition, this piece shows his exploration of the formal elements of painting, including texture, line, colour, shape, form, space, value, and point.</p>
  • <p><strong>Robert Davidson,<em> "There is Light," </em></strong>2012. Serigraph on paper. 39" x 21"</p><p>Robert Davidson is a leading figure in the reinvigorating Haida Formline art and culture. He is influenced by Indigenous Modernism. <strong><em>There is Light</em></strong> shows Davidson's Formalist approach through abstraction, paring an image to essential lines, elemental shapes, and solid and simple use of colour.</p> <p><strong><em>Robert Davidson</em></strong> is a leading figure in the reinvigorating Haida Formline art and culture. He is influenced by Indigenous Modernism. <strong><em>There is Light</em></strong> shows Davidson's Formalist approach through abstraction, paring an image to essential lines, elemental shapes, and solid and simple use of colour.</p>
  • <p><strong>Alan Wood, <em>"On the Beach Walking and Worrying."</em></strong>1991. Assemblage -sculpture, acrylic on plywood. 39"x 117" x 12"</p><p>Alan Wood was born in 1935 in the town of Widnes, in Lancashire, England. Alan Wood moved to Canada in 1971 and settled in British Columbia in 1974. Since that time, he has produced his most personal and mature work as an artist.</p><p>Like Whittome, Alan Wood employed assemblage, which is the three-dimensional version of collage. The artist responded to the landscape through its formal elements like colour, shape, form, and texture to represent the essence ofbeing <strong><em>"On the Beach Walking and Worrying". </em></strong></p> <p><strong>Alan Wood, <em>"On the Beach Walking and Worrying."</em></strong>1991. Assemblage -sculpture, acrylic on plywood. 39"x 117" x 12"</p><p>Alan Wood was born in 1935 in the town of Widnes, in Lancashire, England. Alan Wood moved to Canada in 1971 and settled in British Columbia in 1974. Since that time, he has produced his most personal and mature work as an artist.</p><p>Like Whittome, Alan Wood employed assemblage, which is the three-dimensional version of collage. The artist responded to the landscape through its formal elements like colour, shape, form, and texture to represent the essence ofbeing <strong><em>"On the Beach Walking and Worrying". </em></strong></p>
  • <p><strong>Gordon Smith, <em>"Beach Stick," </em></strong>2006. Collage on drift wood. Dimension variable</p>

The following section also reflects the modernists' method of Formalist reading and response. Artists Jack Shadbolt, Robert Davidson, Alan Wood and Gordon Smith use Collage, Abstraction, and Assemblage methods to push standard artmaking practices and respond to the seascape.