New Ways of Thinking

New Ways of Thinking

  • <p><strong>Rodney Graham, <em>"Napoleon Tree," </em></strong>2003. Colour photograph. 22 1/5" x 20"</p><p>One of Graham’s most ground-breaking series was a group of photographs of upside-down trees. In an interview for Art and Antiques magazine, Graham said that “I created an inverted tree because I wanted to talk about man’s skewed experience of nature inside a functional architectural space in the middle of a landscape.” Through inverting the tree, he challenges romantic symbolism of the tree as unity with the natural world and an image of the nobility of man within nature.</p> <p><strong>Rodney Graham</strong> was born in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada, in 1949. Rodney Graham studied art history at the University of British Columbia from 1968 to 1971 and at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver from 1978 to 1979.</p><p>One of Graham's most groundbreaking series was a group of photographs of upside-down trees and artworks that are both conceptual and humorous. Through the piece titled <em><strong>Napoleon Tree</strong></em>, He references the origins of photography by capturing the inverted and reversed images created by using a camera obscura: a camera that preceded conventional photography by several hundred years. Through inverting the tree upside down, he challenges the romantic symbolism of the tree as unity with the natural world and an image of the nobility of man within nature.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) Karen Zalamea "They are Lost as soon as they are made," <strong>Holly Schmidt <em>"Banana Yucca (Quiescense),</em>" Betty Goodwin<em> "La Memoir du Corps XII,"</em> </strong>and <strong>Wayne Eastcott,<em> "Bayshore 2."</em></strong></p>
  • <p><strong>Holly Schmidt, <em>"Banana Yucca (Quiescence)." </em></strong>Paper-maché. Dimension variable</p><p>Holly Schmidt is a cross-disciplinary artist. Her creative practice crosses disciplines from sculpture and art installation and even food. Her artwork in this exhibition, an upside down <strong><em>Banana Yucca, </em></strong>is part of a more extensive collection called <strong><em>Quiescence</em></strong><em> (a</em> state of inactivity or dormancy, waiting for the right conditions to flourish) which was installed at and by Burrards Arts Foundation (BAF)<em>,</em> consisting of paper-maché sculptures of cornstarch, water, paper, and peppermint oil. Through this "flipped topography," Schmidt invites its viewers to an intimate reflection.</p><p>The artist would like to acknowledge the support of the Burrard Arts Foundation in the creation of this work.</p> <p><strong>Holly Schmidt</strong> is a cross-disciplinary artist. Her creative practice crosses disciplines from sculpture and art installation and even food, to name a few. Her displayed artwork at the exhibition, a <strong><em>Banana Yucca, </em></strong>is part of a more extensive collection called <strong><em>Quiescence</em></strong><em> (a</em> state of inactivity or dormancy, waiting for the right conditions to flourish). The show was installed at and by Burrards Arts Foundation (BAF)<em>,</em> consisting of paper-maché sculptures of cornstarch, water, paper, and peppermint oil. Through this "flipped topography," Schmidt invites its viewers to an intimate reflection.</p>
  • <p><strong>Betty Goodwin, <em>"La Memoire du Corps XII," </em></strong>1992. mixed media on geofilm. 64" X 77"</p><p>Goodwin pushes herself and the viewers to an uncomfortable edge in her piece called <strong><em>La Memoire Du Corps XII</em>. </strong>She embraces and accepts the weird, inconvenient emotions, and she celebrates mistakes and turns them into opportunities for growth and development. Although the tub is no longer in use, for Goodwin, it offered a new meaning. Here, the bathing tub becomes a holder of the human trace or imprints of skin. The idea of the skin is extended further to the material she uses. She draws on <strong>geofilm </strong>to also represent skin, so that the paper becomes a holder of repeated gestures, erasures and traces of Goodwin's own hand.</p> <p><strong>Betty Goodwin, <em>"La Memoire du Corps XII," </em></strong>1992. mixed media on geofilm. 64" X 77"</p><p>Goodwin utilizes multidisciplinary techniques to investigate the human body. Moving from one medium to another has been at the heart of her practice. In a unique approach, she offers an unconventional perspective of the main subject in her piece. 'Subtractive drawing' method, which means 'taking away,' is a significant part of Goodwin's process. For her, the act of removing, wiping, or erasing is a positive gesture, which "becomes part of the medium ...to make something new," she states.</p><p>Goodwin pushes herself and the viewers to an uncomfortable edge in her piece called <strong><em>La Memoire Du Corps XII</em>. </strong>She embraces and accepts the weird, inconvenient emotions, and she celebrates mistakes and turns them into opportunities for growth and development. Although the tub is no longer in use, for Goodwin, it offered a new meaning. Here, the bathing tub becomes a holder of the human trace or imprints of skin. The idea of the skin is extended further to the material she uses. She drwas on <strong>geofilm </strong>toalso represent skin, so that the paper becomes a holder of repeated gestures, erasures and traces of Goodwin's own hand.</p>

The fourth section includes artists Rodney Graham, Holly Schmidt, and Betty Goodwin. These artists are stretching what we would commonly think of as "landscape" through photography, sculpture, and mixed media drawing.