Innovation + Collaboration

Innovation + Collaboration

  • <p>(Left to Right) <strong>Karen Zalamea <em>"They are Lost as soon as they are made,"</em> </strong>Holly Schmidt <em>"Banana Yucca (Quiescense),</em>" Betty Goodwin<em> "La Memoir du Corps XII,"</em> <strong>Wayne Eastcott,<em> "Bayshore 2," </em></strong>and <strong>Xwalacktun, <em>"Inchult Snaam."</em></strong></p> <p>The fifth section looks at artists that use innovative methods to push <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>of their artmaking practice and ways of thinking. Wayne Eastcott, Xwalacktun, Elizabeth Ankoak, Karen Zalamea and Esteban Perez break the barrier of printmaking, carving, textile works, photography and drawing by innovating tools and methods of artmaking and promoting a sense of collaboration.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) Sylvia Tait, "Icarus," <strong>Elizabeth Angrnaqquaq, <em>"Untitled (Wall Hanging),"</em></strong>and <strong>Karen Zalamea <em>"They are lost as soon as they are made."</em> </strong></p> <p>The fifth section looks at artists that use innovative methods to push <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>of their artmaking practice and ways of thinking. Wayne Eastcott, Xwalacktun, Elizabeth Ankoak, Karen Zalamea and Esteban Perez break the barrier of printmaking, carving, textile works, photography and drawing by innovating tools and methods of artmaking and promoting a sense of collaboration.</p>
  • <p>(Left to Right) <strong>Esteban Pérez,<em> "Liquid Beings," </em></strong>and <strong>Gordon Smith,<em> "LG I."</em></strong></p> <p>The fifth section looks at artists that use innovative methods to push <strong><em>Beyond the Horizon </em></strong>of their artmaking practice and ways of thinking. Wayne Eastcott, Xwalacktun, Elizabeth Ankoak, Karen Zalamea and Esteban Pérez break the barrier of printmaking, carving, textile works, photography and drawing by innovating tools and methods of artmaking and promoting a sense of collaboration.</p>
  • <p><strong>Wayne Eastcott.<em> "Bayshore 2."</em></strong> 2001. Serigraph, acrylic, enamel on aluminum. 37 1/4" x 58" x 1"</p><p><em><strong>Bayshore 2</strong></em> shows how Eastcott pushes conventional printing on paper, expanding to aluminum, which is an unusual surface. He often reworks compositions with gestural effects using various inks (often handmade) to create visually rich collages of man-made and natural images.He depicts the interconnectedness of the universe. He successfully connects the two opposite worlds of organic and technological, bringing together urban, mechanical, and landscape forms layered with geometric shapes. </p> <p>In 1966, <strong><em>Wayne Eastcott </em></strong>graduated with honours in painting and printmaking from the Vancouver School of Art (ECUAD) and embarked on innovative printmaking. In 1968 he developed a new printmaking technique, the Xerox technique.</p><p><strong><em>Bayshore</em></strong> <strong><em>2</em></strong> shows how the artist pushed conventional printing on paper, expanding to aluminum, an unusual surface. He often reworks compositions with gestural effects using various inks (often handmade) to create visually rich collages of man-made and natural images. <em>His </em>exploration ranges from the interconnectedness of the universe. He successfully connects the two opposite worlds of organic and technological, bringing together urban, mechanical, and landscape forms layered with geometric shapes.</p>
  • <p><strong>Xwalacktun, <em>"Inchult Snaam."</em></strong></p><p>Xwalacktun is an artists from the Squamish Nation. He uses formline design<u>s</u> in his carvings. Here, the artist was thinking about pushing his carving practice through the idea of multiples similar to printing. So, Xwalacktun carved a mould and cast paper to produce prints.</p>
  • <p><strong>Elizabeth Angrnaqquaq,<em> "Untitled (Wall Hanging)." </em></strong>1981. Melton cloth, thread, wall hanging 26" x 28"</p><p>Elizabeth Angrnaqquaq is an Inuit textile artist. She lived a traditional Inuit life until the 1950s when the Canadian government forced her people to move to permanent cities by shooting their sled dogs. Her move to Nunavut allowed the artist to expand her practice by using western materials like felt and thread<s>s</s>. Here, she learned to apply her traditional skill of sewing and decorating skin clothing to the art of producing images on felt. Angrnaqquaq was one of the pioneer members of a group of Inuit women artists who first began producing embroidered and appliquéd wall-hangings in Baker Lake.</p>
  • <p><strong>Esteban Pérez,<em> "Liquid Beings," </em></strong>2021. Red cedar pigment on paper, sound. Dimension variable</p><p>Esteban was born in Quito, Ecuador and is now based in Vancouver. He is a recent MFA Graduate at Emily Carr University. His interdisciplinary practice includes painting, sculpture, installation art, and performance art.</p><p><strong><em>Liquid Beings </em></strong><strong>(2021)</strong> is a series of drawings that incorporate elements from the earth. This series of five drawings using red cedar pigment on paper isaccompanied by a stretched and amplified recording of the earth. This project was done with the guidance of Aaron Neslon-Moody, a Squamish Nation artist, who connected Pérez to Pacific Northwest Coast Indigenous history and culture.</p>
  • <p><strong>Esteban Pérez,<em> "Liquid Beings," </em></strong>2021. Red cedar pigment on paper, sound. Dimension variable</p><p><strong><em>Esteban Pérez </em></strong>was born in Quito, Ecuador and is now based in Vancouver. He is a recent MFA Graduate at Emily Carr University. His interdisciplinary practice expands from painting, sculpture, installation art, and performance art.</p><p><strong><em>Liquid Beings</em></strong> presents the artist's practice of incorporating elements from the earth. This is a series of five drawings using red cedar pigment on paper and accompanied by a stretched and amplified recording of the earth. Esteban innovated a paint from the red cedar pigment, added with walnut oil. This project was done with the guidance of another Squamish Nation artist named Splash or Aaron Nelson-Moody, who connected Pérez to Indigenous history and culture in Canada.</p>
  • <p><strong>Esteban Pérez,<em> "Liquid Beings," </em></strong>2021. Red cedar pigment on paper, sound. Dimension variable</p><p>Esteban Pérez was born in Quito, Ecuador and is now based in Vancouver. He is a recent MFA Graduate at Emily Carr University. His interdisciplinary practice expands from painting, sculpture, installation art, and performance art.</p><p><strong><em>Liquid Beings</em></strong> presents the artist's practice of incorporating elements from the earth. This is a series of five drawings using red cedar pigment on paper and accompanied by a stretched and amplified recording of the earth. Esteban innovated a paint from the red cedar pigment, added with walnut oil. This project was done with the guidance of another Squamish Nation artist named Splash or Aaron Nelson-Moody, who connected Pérez to Indigenous history and culture in Canada.</p>
  • <p><strong>Karen Zalamea, <em>"They are lost as soon as they are made." </em></strong>2015-2020. Archival inkjet prints. 16" x 20 " each</p><p>Interdisciplinary artist <strong><em>Karen Zalamea </em></strong>is a Filipino-Canadian artist, educator, and cultural worker. Her project <strong><em>They Are Lost As Soon As They Are Made </em></strong>gives a new perspective into the Icelandic Landscape. Zalamea made a large, handcrafted format 4x5-inch analogue film camera and created a lens for the camera using frozen local water samples. Here, Zalamea enables the Landscape to capture itself. Furthermore, she pushed the discipline of photography and its mechanism, breaking the boundaries of landscape photography and preconceived notions about and imagery of the Landscape.</p>

The fifth section looks at artists that use innovative methods to push Beyond the Horizon of their artmaking practice and ways of thinking. Wayne Eastcott, Xwalacktun, Elizabeth Ankoak, Karen Zalamea and Esteban Pérez break the barrier of printmaking, carving, textile works, photography and drawing by innovating tools and methods of artmaking and promoting a sense of collaboration.