Conclusion

Conclusion

  • <p><strong>Robert Davidson,<em> "Looking Back at Where we Came From."</em></strong> 2000. Serigraph on paper. 17" x 40"</p>
  • <p>(Middled) <strong>Bill Reid, <em>"Xhuwaji – Ceremonial Drum + Drumstick."</em> </strong>1988acrylic paint, spruce, deer hide23" dia. (ceremonial drum)  + baton. H: 18"</p>
  • <p><strong>Beyond the Horizon</strong> is an expression that encourages us to consider what is "farther than the possible limit of sight, beyond what we can foresee, know or anticipate."1 It is both visual - what we see - and conceptual - what we know. The horizon as a metaphor provides us with an opportunity to challenge and evaluate our own ways of knowing. The artists in this exhibition expand conventional uses of materials and explore modes of making through collaboration with other artists and the land.</p><p>1. thefreedictionary.com</p>
  • <p><strong>Robert Davidson,<em> "Meeting at the Centre." </em></strong>2004.Aluminum &amp; expoxy powder coated. 40" x 78" X 78"</p>

In essence, this exhibition strives to promote positive mental health and well-being of its viewers through the collection. The phrase Beyond the Horizon becomes a reminder of the endless possibilities available to us. The expression serves as an optimistic motivation for any individual to push oneself out of their comfort zone. The exhibition invites viewers to open to the process of trial-and-error. It encourages viewers to push their limits and to feel comfortable with the unknown to expand beyond their horizons. Betty Goodwin quotes, "things come when they are ready to come. And when they are ready... you push and push and push ...just keep going and persevere." No one can tell us what is beyond the horizon except ourselves.